<<< o >>>Ilyushin Il-76 #2 12 comments + add yours
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This is the second of three images I'll be posting of the interior of this Ilyushin Il-76 cargo plane. My previous entry was a shot of the cockpit (and included the back story of how Jason and I ran into a few problems with the local police), this one – a shot of the tail section – and a final image that I'll post on Friday: a shot of the lower section at the front of the plane (visible in this shot of Jason's).

As with my previous entry this is also (and obviously) an HDR, constructed from a bracketed sequence of 12 exposures with a 1 EV spacing using Photomatix Pro. And again, if you take a look at the original you can see the tone mapped image and small thumbnails of all 12 exposures. In this instance the post-production wasn't especially complicated, but it is worth mentioning that the rusty door or the right was pasted in from one of the original exposures as the tone mapped version ended up looking more than a bit overdone.

As always, let me know what you think.

captured
camera
lens
aperture
shutter speed
shooting mode
exposure bias
metering mode
ISO
flash
image quality
RAW converter
image editor
plugins (etc)
cropped?
3.41pm on 15/3/11
Canon 5D Mark II
EF 15mm f/2.8 fisheye
f/11.0
12 exposures (1/500 to 4s)
manual
n/a
evaluative
100
no
RAW
Photomatix Pro
Photoshop CS5
none
no
 
3x2 + HDR + travel [Dubai, UAE] + show the original
comment by Matteo at 07:21 AM (GMT) on 6 April, 2011

Orange rust => instadrool
What an amazing feature would be a rolloverable thumbnails strip showing every exposure enlarged... ;)

comment by Justin Photis at 09:09 AM (GMT) on 6 April, 2011

I prefer this to the shot from yesterday. I like the closeness of the scene I think.
Nice range on the exposures. 12 is a pretty big sequence to capture all the darkest and lighted areas, how many can the camera manage ?

comment by Philip Jensen at 09:35 AM (GMT) on 6 April, 2011

I agree with Justin, even though I liked the J├Ągermeister in the picture yesterday ;).

It is amazing how you make this image feel really appealing. Once again I am truly stunned! I especially like the framing done by the door on the right and the "blanket" on the left. Thumbs up!

comment by djn1 at 09:41 AM (GMT) on 6 April, 2011

Matteo and Philip: thanks :)

Justin: I was shooting in manual so could shoot as many exposures as I needed. The only constraint would have been if I'd needed an exposure beyond 30s, at which point I'd have needed to switch to Bulb or use my timer.

comment by Dan Kaufman at 01:38 PM (GMT) on 6 April, 2011

well done with the door! It looks so authentic, as if I could reach into the monitor and touch it. The color brown seems to be a challenge for me (don't know why). This door though almost seems to stand apart from the rest of the aircraft--the real vs. the unreal.

comment by Carlos Garcia at 02:00 PM (GMT) on 6 April, 2011

Great David! This is such a great environment and your processing brings so much to life! Congrats!

comment by John at 12:34 PM (GMT) on 7 April, 2011

Great subject and cool shots

comment by Al at 04:06 PM (GMT) on 7 April, 2011

So far, I prefer this shot in your series as opposed to the first one. I think rusty door off to the right is a nice "lead in" to the rest of the image.

Wow a 12 exposure sequence and all shot in manual. If I had to guess, did you use the dial on the camera itself to adjust the shutter speed? Were you concerned of any camera shake when doing this (I would imagine you were also using a tripod)...

I did read your book on HDR photography but could you quickly remind me how you came up with a 12 exposure shot? You metered the lightest part of the scene and the darkest to come up with a range, correct?

comment by djn1 at 04:14 PM (GMT) on 7 April, 2011

Al: yes, this was shot in manual, on a sturdy tripod, and I did use the dial to adjust the shutter speed for each exposure. In terms of determining the exposures I needed: in this case I worked out the darkest image I needed (1/500 @ f/11) then carried on shooting until the histogram of the lightest image indicated that I'd captured enough detail in the darkest areas of the scene. I could have worked this out in advance, but as nothing was moving in the scene it was easy enough to check the histograms for each shot as I went along.

comment by Chris at 05:50 PM (GMT) on 7 April, 2011

I think I am out numbered in this case. I do like this image but I strongly prefer the previous image over this one. I enjoyed viewing the super wide angle of the cockpit environment. When I first saw this image and before reading your narrative description, I thought the image was composed with two styles. The background was the typical HDR look while the door was not so much. After reading the description, I understood more. I can see why people prefer this image because of that feeling of entering the area. I look at it as, I am entering, I am here but not interested in the area I just entered.

comment by Jason at 08:48 PM (GMT) on 8 April, 2011

Love that door! I missed capturing the entire handle on mine and I think the door really makes the shot. Very cleverly shot and processed :)

comment by Michael Behlen at 05:05 PM (GMT) on 9 April, 2011

My favorite shot of the series, amazing composition and super sharp!