Yesterday, Neil asked me if my image of the two photographs and the electrical sockets was one of my “engaged images”, by which I’m fairly sure he’s referencing my tendency to complain about some of my images on the grounds that I often go off the ones that require more than a minimal amount of work in Photoshop.

And this got me thinking about whether there was some sort of pattern to how I respond to the images I take. And I suppose there is (though it doesn’t always apply). For the most part, when I take a shot, I either i) definitely know it will work (though this doesn’t happen all that often – tomorrow’s shot is one of these), ii) I think it will work (subject to some work in Photoshop) – today’s shot falls into this category (more of which below), or iii) I hope it will work, but suspect that it probably wont … I take lots of these ;-)

Today’s shot is one of the ones I thought would work, though I knew that the original would probably be too flat – it was a dull and grey day. So, I used a Curves adjustment to darken and increase the contrast in the sky, another to increase the contrast in the sign, desaturated the sky (to remove some colour noise), and slightly changed the colour of the sign – the original was a slightly more faded shade of blue. And all in all I’m happy with how it turned out … definitely one of my “engaged images” ;-)

camera
capture date
aperture
shutter speed
shooting mode
exposure bias
metering mode
ISO
focal length
image quality
white balance
optical filter
 
Canon G5
2.42pm on 15/3/04
f4.0
1/320
program AE
+0.0
evaluative
100
10.2mm
RAW
auto
B+W UV 010
 
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headroom / 17 March, 2004 [click for previous image: framed sockets]
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